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Jrdn

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  1. 166 votes
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    2 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Jrdn supported this idea  · 
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    1 comment  ·  Office 365 Security & Compliance » Auditing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Jrdn supported this idea  · 
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    38 comments  ·  Office 365 Admin » Exchange Admin  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    The limit you are talking about protects against large volume senders overwhelming the shared resources of our service and ensures emails are not all sent out at once for automated systems. Can you please tell us more about the problems this causes to the software that queueing and retries are not able to handle?

    Jrdn commented  · 

    Many legacy business applications have very limited email configurations, due to having been built for wholly on prem infrastructure. I don't see a reason that it would be a problem for most applications if the mailbox would accept the mail and que it in the outbox until it can be sent.

    This is actually affecting is most on the receive side. Some of our edge devices currently only support email reporting, and many are running jobs on a schedule which means we could have 50+ notifications at one time. The 30 messages per min is causing dropped reporting email

    I would be in favor of allowing admins to increase the limit to some slightly higher limit, or adding in a "bulk" SKU of some sort to allow mailboxes to bypass the limit.

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