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  1. 2 votes
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    4 comments  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
  2. 6 votes
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    1 comment  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    In the excitement of getting stuck into life in a new country and tackling all the challenges that presents, it's easy for pensions to slip down the list of things to keep track of. This is especially true if you don't plan to stay in Sweden long-term. But don't let it fall off the radar; follow The Local's guide to manage and maximize your Swedish pension, even if you don't intend to stay here permanently.

    Image
    If you're working and paying tax in Sweden, you're probably entitled to a pension. Here's what you need to know. Photo: Simon Paulin/imagebank.sweden.se
    This article is available to Members of The Local. Read more about membership here.

    The Swedish pension is part of the country's social insurance system, and it can seem like a confusing beast at times. The good news is that if you're living and working here, you'll almost certainly be earning towards a pension, and you'll be able to get that money even if you move elsewhere before retirement.

    Exactly how much money goes into your pension pot depends on many factors, including your salary, length of time working in Sweden, your company's policy, and your own personal decisions (especially if you're self-employed). Those who spend only a few years working in Sweden will earn a much smaller pension than people who work here for their whole lives, but that money could come in very useful once you retire, so it's important to know what you'll be entitled to.

    The easiest way to understand how the Swedish pension works is breaking it down into three parts. There are three different sources for the Swedish pension: the state, your employer, and yourself.

    If you've worked and paid tax in Sweden, you should be entitled to a Swedish pension. Photo: Simon Paulin/imagebank.sweden.se

    First, there's the state pension (allmän pension), which comes from money paid in tax, and makes up the biggest part of most people's total pensions. It falls under the remit of the Pensionsmyndigheten or the Swedish Pensions Agency, a government authority dedicated to, you guessed it, pensions.

    Absolutely everyone who has worked and paid tax in Sweden is entitled to this pension, and it's split into two parts: an income pension and a premium pension.

    The income pension (inkomstpension) makes up the bulk of this. Each year, 16 percent of your income is paid into this pension. In this context, 'income' includes wages as well as all other taxable benefits such as paid sickness or parental leave, and unemployment benefits.

    It's the employer who pays this, as part of the fees associated with employment, so you won't see it deducted from your salary and there's nothing that you as an employee need to do. The higher your salary, the higher the income pension will be, although once you reach the upper limit on pensionable income, your state pension won't increase any further. This upper ceiling was 41,359 kronor per month for the income year 2017, though this amount is regularly adjusted.

    Keep track of your Swedish pension to be prepared for retirement. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT

    On top of the income pension, a further 2.5 percent of your income goes into investment funds (the premium pension or 'premiepension'). Again, this is paid by the employer, but if you want to, you can choose which funds your money goes into. If you do not make a choice, your money will be invested in AP7 Såfa, the Seventh AP Fund (National Generation Management Option) which is the default option.

    If you do want to move your funds, this can be done as often as you want, for free, by logging into the Swedish Pensions Agency's website using BankID. You can have up to five funds at the same time, and there is a list

  3. 2 votes
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    1 comment  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    In the excitement of getting stuck into life in a new country and tackling all the challenges that presents, it's easy for pensions to slip down the list of things to keep track of. This is especially true if you don't plan to stay in Sweden long-term. But don't let it fall off the radar; follow The Local's guide to manage and maximize your Swedish pension, even if you don't intend to stay here permanently.

    Image
    If you're working and paying tax in Sweden, you're probably entitled to a pension. Here's what you need to know. Photo: Simon Paulin/imagebank.sweden.se
    This article is available to Members of The Local. Read more about membership here.

    The Swedish pension is part of the country's social insurance system, and it can seem like a confusing beast at times. The good news is that if you're living and working here, you'll almost certainly be earning towards a pension, and you'll be able to get that money even if you move elsewhere before retirement.

    Exactly how much money goes into your pension pot depends on many factors, including your salary, length of time working in Sweden, your company's policy, and your own personal decisions (especially if you're self-employed). Those who spend only a few years working in Sweden will earn a much smaller pension than people who work here for their whole lives, but that money could come in very useful once you retire, so it's important to know what you'll be entitled to.

    The easiest way to understand how the Swedish pension works is breaking it down into three parts. There are three different sources for the Swedish pension: the state, your employer, and yourself.

    If you've worked and paid tax in Sweden, you should be entitled to a Swedish pension. Photo: Simon Paulin/imagebank.sweden.se

    First, there's the state pension (allmän pension), which comes from money paid in tax, and makes up the biggest part of most people's total pensions. It falls under the remit of the Pensionsmyndigheten or the Swedish Pensions Agency, a government authority dedicated to, you guessed it, pensions.

    Absolutely everyone who has worked and paid tax in Sweden is entitled to this pension, and it's split into two parts: an income pension and a premium pension.

    The income pension (inkomstpension) makes up the bulk of this. Each year, 16 percent of your income is paid into this pension. In this context, 'income' includes wages as well as all other taxable benefits such as paid sickness or parental leave, and unemployment benefits.

    It's the employer who pays this, as part of the fees associated with employment, so you won't see it deducted from your salary and there's nothing that you as an employee need to do. The higher your salary, the higher the income pension will be, although once you reach the upper limit on pensionable income, your state pension won't increase any further. This upper ceiling was 41,359 kronor per month for the income year 2017, though

  4. 3 votes
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    2 comments  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    In the excitement of getting stuck into life in a new country and tackling all the challenges that presents, it's easy for pensions to slip down the list of things to keep track of. This is especially true if you don't plan to stay in Sweden long-term. But don't let it fall off the radar; follow The Local's guide to manage and maximize your Swedish pension, even if you don't intend to stay here permanently.

    Image
    If you're working and paying tax in Sweden, you're probably entitled to a pension. Here's what you need to know. Photo: Simon Paulin/imagebank.sweden.se
    This article is available to Members of The Local. Read more about membership here.

    The Swedish pension is part of the country's social insurance system, and it can seem like a confusing beast at times. The good news is that if you're living and working here, you'll almost certainly be earning towards a pension, and you'll be able to get that money even if you move elsewhere before retirement.

    Exactly how much money goes into your pension pot depends on many factors, including your salary, length of time working in Sweden, your company's policy, and your own personal decisions (especially if you're self-employed). Those who spend only a few years working in Sweden will earn a much smaller pension than people who work here for their whole lives, but that money could come in very useful once you retire, so it's important to know what you'll be entitled to.

    The easiest way to understand how the Swedish pension works is breaking it down into three parts. There are three different sources for the Swedish pension: the state, your employer, and yourself.

    An error occurred while saving the comment
    Anonymous commented  · 

    Vb

    Anonymous supported this idea  · 
  5. 1 vote
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    2 comments  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    BC91-61DC090357E9","name":"com.apple.WebKit.WebContent","is_first_party":true,"app_version":"8603","share_with_app_devs":false,"slice_uuid":"C7833199-E678-3DF2-AFC4-025CDD052382"}
    Date/Time: 2018-02-28 17:40:27.981885 +0100
    OS Version: iPhone OS 10.3.3 (Build 14G60)
    Architecture: arm
    Report Version: 19

    Command: com.apple.WebKit.WebContent
    Path: /System/Library/Frameworks/WebKit.framework/XPCServices/com.apple.WebKit.WebContent.xpc/com.apple.WebKit.WebContent
    Version: 8603 (8603.3.8)
    Parent: launchd [1]
    PID: 2845

    Event: wakeups
    Wakeups: 45008 wakeups over the last 274 seconds (164 wakeups per second average), exceeding limit of 150 wakeups per second over 300 seconds
    Duration: 274.25s
    Steps: 110

    Hardware model: iPhone5,4
    Active cpus: 2

    Powerstats for: com.apple.WebKit [2845]
    UUID: C7833199-E678-3DF2-AFC4-025CDD052382
    Start time: 2018-02-28 17:43:58 +0100
    End time: 2018-02-28 17:45:01 +0100
    Parent: launchd
    Microstackshots: 110 samples (100%)
    Primary state: 96 samples Non-Frontmost App, User mode, Effective Thread QoS User Initiated, Requested Thread QoS User Interactive, Override Thread QoS Unspecified
    User Activity: 0 samples Idle, 110 samples Active
    Power Source: 110 samples on Battery, 0 samples on AC
    45 ??? [0]
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    Bn

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  6. 114 votes
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    31 comments  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We are interested in understanding this feature request better. Is this functionality available somewhere else within Office 365?

    Anonymous supported this idea  · 
  7. 38 votes
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    7 comments  ·  M365 (Microsoft 365) Admin Mobile  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    Vknjhg

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