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  1. 369 votes
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    4 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Anonymous commented  · 

    Does this boil down to not wanting to assign licenses for accounts that are used for larger work processes (like a Flow that is used by all users and accesses sensitive data using elevated privileges as you mention)?

    As you point out, you can certainly setup accounts that meet the criteria of having elevated privileges in whatever environment you need (HR system in your example) and then hooking that up to a PowerApp or Flow.

    If you don't want that account to have a mailbox or OneDrive or any other Office 365 workload, you can disable those assigned plans depending on their license.

    But you would presumably still need the account to have the appropriate Office 365 license and plans enabled to run the PowerApp or Flow and access the Office 365 services it is dependent on.

    This question has come up quite a bit in a our PowerApp and Flow workshops. That is, organizations don't want to have a broadly used, extremely important Flow running under the context of a single user account when that user may or get hit by a bus or win the lottery, or get mad or whatever. So, yes, a "service" account that is setup and managed appropriately makes sense. But I am unclear of what the ask is for Microsoft. We do this all the time today already...other than not assigning a license.

  2. 11,229 votes
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    404 comments  ·  Office 365 Admin  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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